Journalism


Pico Diary: LA Review of Books 2/25

Lunch at the Cemitas Poblanas truck, kindergarteners on their way to make pizza, and a chat with the EMT guys at the Fire Station
— my new Pico Diary, at the LA Review of Books: HERE.

Tavis Smiley Q&A: The Nation 2/8

Tavis Smiley talks about Martin Luther King’s final year—the year that began with his speech condemning the war in Vietnam, where he called the US “the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today.”  That year ended, of course, with the sanitation workers’ strike in Memphis.
Print version of the longer interview published online on MLK Day HERE

Anna Deveare Smith: Report from Baltimore–TheNation.com 1/29

The actor and playwright talks about performing in her home town of Baltimore after the police killed Freddie Gray–dramatizing the school-to-prison pipeline–and organizing theater audiences in the process.
Continued at TheNation.com HERE

Tavis Smiley: Martin Luther King’s Last Year: TheNation.com 1/18

Tavis Smiley talks about Martin Luther King’s final year—the year that began with his speech condemning the war in Vietnam, where he called the US “the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today.”  That year ended, of course, with the sanitation workers’ strike in Memphis.
At TheNation.com, HERE

 

 

Pico Blvd. Diary: LA Review of Books 1-5-16

A caravan of four Stanford football buses roars down Pico Boulevard with a police escort — in town for the Rose Bowl. I stand at the corner with a delivery guy from the Domino’s Pizza down the block — he’s an older Latino man.

He asks, “Is it Obama?” . . .

Continue reading  at LA Review of Books HERE

Margo Jefferson on ‘Negroland’: The Nation 10/22

Q. You grew up in the fifties in Chicago in a world you call “Negroland.” What was “Negroland”?
Margo Jefferson
: Negroland is my name for a small region of Negro America where residents were sheltered by a certain amount of privilege and plenty. Children in Negroland were warned that few Negroes enjoyed privilege or plenty and that most whites would be glad to see them returned to indigence, deference, and subservience.
–“10 Questions for Margo Jefferson,” continued at TheNation.com, HERE.

Bill McKibben: “a rare emotion: hope” KPFK 7/15

LISTEN online HERE   iTunes podcast HERE
BILL McKIBBEN
says the progress on solar power has given him what he calls “a fairly rare emotion: hope.” Bill is one of our heroes –a founder of 350.org, the first planet-wide, grassroots climate change movement. He also spearheaded the resistance to the Keystone pipeline, going to jail in the process, and launched the fossil fuel divestment movement. He wrote about solar power for the New Yorker, HERE.

Once again, we’re not done with the sixties: TODD GITLIN says Bernie Sanders’s start in the sixties explains how he got where he is today. Todd teaches journalism and sociology at Columbia; he wrote the classic history The Sixties: Years of Hope, Days of Rage. He wrote about Bernie’s roots in the sixties for The New York Times, HERE.

Also: Gay marriage won by arguing for equality. Should abortion rights be making an equality argument? KATHA POLLITT, columnist for The Nation, talks about opposition to women’s equality as a key issue of our time. She wrote about the equality argument for abortion HERE.